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Ownership Everything You Could Possibly Want To Know About Engine Blocks

03:35  21 march  2018
03:35  21 march  2018 Source:   jalopnik.com

The Amazing Engine Collection of the Museum of American Speed

  The Amazing Engine Collection of the Museum of American Speed We’re living in the Golden Age of Horsepower. No other time in history has witnessed how horsepower from an internal combustion engine has been so easy to achieve. This didn't happen overnight, however, and to really appreciate the evolution of horsepower, do yourself a favor and spend a day at Bill Smith's exceptional Museum of American Speed any time you're near Lincoln, Nebraske. A wise man once said that in order to know where you are going, you really need to know where you've been.

The folks behind the How a Car Works channel uploaded this video today that is filled with all of the information that you ’d ever need to know about engine blocks .

You know what I hate about YouTube videos? You go on to try and learn about something, and so many of them utterly ruin the experience by playing some kind of obnoxious intro or loud music. Not this in-depth video of an engine block .


You know what I hate about YouTube videos? You go on to try and learn about something, and so many of them utterly ruin the experience by playing some kind of obnoxious intro or loud music. Not these guys. Not this in-depth video of an engine block.

The folks behind the How a Car Works channel uploaded this video today that is filled with all of the information that you’d ever need to know about engine blocks. The host has a block from a 2001 Mazda Miata and he goes through and points out what each port and hole is for. If you are a visual learner like me, this is just spectacular.

The best part? It’s only a guy talking about an engine block, with an actual engine block to illustrate what he’s talking about for nearly 18 minutes straight. Nobody yells at you to LIKE SUBSCRIBE AND SHARE at the end. It’s like a college lecture. Except not boring and free.

via Road & Track

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The Experimental Engine That Uses Gas and Diesel .
A Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition engine can achieve 60 percent thermal efficiency. That's incredible.This engine only lives on a test bench now, as Engineering Explained's Jason Fenske details. It's a concept developed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison that in lab testing has achieved 60 percent thermal efficiency. That means this engine is converting 60 percent of its fuel used into power rather than waste energy-a much higher number than any automotive engine in production today. For context, Toyota has a new 2.0-liter four-cylinder that achieves a remarkable 40 percent thermal efficiency, while Mercedes-AMG's F1 power unit achieves 50 percent.

Source: http://us.pressfrom.com/autos/ownership/-128816-everything-you-could-possibly-want-to-know-about-engine-blocks/

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