The page you are looking for is temporarily unavailable.
Please try again later

Health & Fit Higher levels of vitamin D may lower colon cancer risk

18:07  14 june  2018
18:07  14 june  2018 Source:   nbcnews.com

'Artificial mole' could warn of cancer: study

  'Artificial mole' could warn of cancer: study Swiss scientists have developed an experimental skin implant that darkens like a mole when it detects subtle changes in the body that may be an early warning sign of cancer, a study said Wednesday. The implant, or "biomedical tattoo," as researchers call it, has been tested in lab animals, lasts about a year and recognizes the four most common types of cancer: prostate, lung, colon and breast cancer.It works by reacting to the level of calcium in the blood, which rises when a tumor is developing. About 40 percent of cancers could theoretically be detected this way, researchers said.

Since sun exposure helps you make vitamin D , researchers think that the higher rates of colon cancer may be due to low vitamin D levels . A recent review of many studies found that high vitamin D levels in your body are linked to a lower risk of developing colon cancer 4.

High blood levels of vitamin D are associated with a lower risk of colon cancer , finds a large European study. 11, 2014 — Adults who consume a high -protein diet may be at a lower risk for developing high blood pressure, concludes a study that found participants consuming the highest

Image: Pensive woman looking through window with feet up on desk in sunny home officeSunlight is the easiest way for the body to absorb vitamin D, but too much UV exposure can increase risk of skin cancer. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: Pensive woman looking through window with feet up on desk in sunny home officeSunlight is the easiest way for the body to absorb vitamin D, but too much UV exposure can increase risk of skin cancer. Higher than currently recommended amounts of the 'sunshine vitamin' might offer protection against colorectal cancer.

Long touted for its role in keeping bones strong — vitamin D also may be important in preventing colon cancer.

New research from the American Cancer Society and other public health groups finds people with higher than recommended blood levels of vitamin D have a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer. The finding was particularly significant for women.

Skin Cancer Associated With Reduced Alzheimer's Risk

  Skin Cancer Associated With Reduced Alzheimer's Risk It's not yet clear why skin cancer survivors had a dramatically reduced risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.Skin cancer may reduce a patient’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by as much as 92 percent, a new study revealed. Although it’s not clear why, there appears to be an association between lower Alzheimer’s disease risk in patients with certain skin cancers, there are likely both neurologic and biologic factors at play.

People with abundant levels of vitamin D -- the so-called sunshine vitamin -- may have a much lower risk of colon cancer , a study shows. Study Shows Higher Blood Levels of Vitamin D Linked to Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer .

Risk factors. Ovarian cancer may be affected by a diet high in animal products. These foods have a lot of protein and fat, which increase the amount of growth factor. Studies compared the rates of vitamin D and breast, colon , and rectal cancers . Compared to low levels of vitamin D (below 20 ng/mL [50

The opposite may also be true: people with a vitamin D deficiency were found to have an increased risk for the disease.

The new research project combines data on more than 12,000 people in Europe, Asia and the U.S.

"Participants who had vitamin D levels that were higher than the recommended levels had a statistically significant 22 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer," said Marjorie McCullough, senior scientific director at the American Cancer Society.

But some outside experts say more research is needed before doctors recommend vitamin D supplements specifically for colon cancer prevention.

Dr. Zhaoping Li, director at the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition, said the research is informative, but does not prove increasing vitamin D levels would prevent colon cancer. Instead, "this gives us a good reason to invest time and effort to see whether vitamin D can have an impact on colon cancer incidence," said Li.

Should You Stop Wearing Sunscreen To Get More Vitamin D? Here's What a Doctor Says

  Should You Stop Wearing Sunscreen To Get More Vitamin D? Here's What a Doctor Says Last year, a study published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association made headlines when it asserted that sunscreen use is partially to blame for widespread vitamin D deficiency worldwide. The research raised questions, given that consistently wearing sunscreen is one of the most common pieces of advice from physicians.

21, 2010 -- Soaking in more sunlight and drinking more dairy may help you ward off colon cancer . Researchers in Europe have found that They discovered that those with the highest blood levels of vitamin D had a nearly 40% decrease in colorectal cancer risk than those with the lowest levels .

Soaking in more sunlight and drinking more dairy may help you ward off colon cancer according to a report in Medscape. They discovered that those with the highest blood levels of vitamin D had a nearly 40% decrease in colorectal cancer risk than those with the lowest levels .

"This is not the smoking gun," she said. Li was not involved with this latest American Cancer Society study.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. And there's been a worrisome rise in the number of younger adults diagnosed with the disease.

That's why the American Cancer Society recently lowered the recommended age to begin colorectal screening from 50 to age 45. It's one of the few cancers that can be prevented with screening tools like colonoscopy.

But could vitamin D be another path to prevention? Dietary guidelines suggest most adults get at least 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day. This new research finds even larger amounts would offer stronger protection against colorectal cancer. However, study authors warn there's a limit on the apparent benefit.

"It's worth noting that people who had the highest levels that we looked at did not continue to see a lower risk of colorectal cancer, so there does appear to be this sweet spot," said McCullough.

Exercise Can Lower Your Disease Risk Even When Your Genes Work Against You

  Exercise Can Lower Your Disease Risk Even When Your Genes Work Against You Having a family history of heart disease or certain cancers doesn't mean lifestyle changes won’t matter.But as public health experts – and probably your doctor – stress, lifestyle has a big impact on cardiovascular health. And while advice to eat well and be physically active is broadcast to all, new research – and the largest study of its kind published last month in the American Heart Association journal Circulation – also drive home this point.

Optimal vitamin D and calcium status may thus be an important preventive strategy against colon cancer . High levels of both vitamin D metabolites were associated with a non-significantly lower risk of breast cancer .

The risk of breast, colon , and rectal cancer was reduced by 15% to 25% in women with high vitamin D levels . High levels may also lower the risk of endometrial cancer . High vitamin D levels may increase survival after cancer diagnosis.

It's unclear where that sweet spot is, though.

True cancer prevention likely comes from multiple lifestyle changes: exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, not smoking and a healthy diet rich in fiber, as well as, yes, vitamin D.

Li almost always recommends at least 1,000 IU a day. She said there's emerging evidence that vitamin D not only regulates calcium for bone health — it also may impact the immune system and cell growth.

Sunlight is the easiest way for the body to absorb D, but of course too much UV light can increase the risk for skin cancer. Experts say casual exposure to the sun — a short walk down the street or running to catch a bus, for example — is generally sufficient.

Vitamin D is also found in a few foods: cod liver oil, fatty fish like salmon, tuna, egg yolks and fortified cereal, milk and orange juice.

Experts aren't suggesting everyone should rush to their doctors to get their vitamin D levels checked.

"People who are at higher risk of having lower levels are people who are never exposed to the sun, people who have dark skin who live in northern latitudes, and who don't eat the foods that are fortified by vitamin D and who don't like fatty fish," said McCullough.

The American Cancer Society predicts more than 140,000 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year, and more than 50,000 will die from the disease.

If you were born in the 80s or later, you're at significantly higher risk of colon and rectal cancer — and experts say you should get screened younger .
<p>Colorectal cancer disease rates are rising quickly for young people, who tend to drink and smoke less, but have higher obesity rates.</p><p><br></p>This spike has led the American Cancer Society (ACS) to recommend that people start getting screened for colorectal cancer — a term often used to describe colon and rectal cancers — at age 45 instead of 50, the society announced Wednesday.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!