The page you are looking for is temporarily unavailable.
Please try again later

Smart Living The Fascinating, Fantastical History of the Easter Basket

00:36  13 march  2018
00:36  13 march  2018 Source:   southernliving.com

Pancake-Flavored Peeps Are Real, and You Can Buy Them Right Now

  Pancake-Flavored Peeps Are Real, and You Can Buy Them Right Now When restaurants and food manufacturers want to make something bonkers, one of the most reliable ways to do that is to just add Peeps. According to Moneyish’s Jeanette Settembre, the new Pancakes and Syrup peeps are exclusively being sold at Kroger supermarkets, and they’re available now for $1.25 for a pack of 10.

  The Fascinating, Fantastical History of the Easter Basket © Vstock LLC/Getty Images These days, baskets overflowing with candy and colorful eggs are as synonymous with Easter as Christmas trees are with Christmas. But marshmallow Peeps were just a twinkle in some brilliant businessman’s eye when Christians began celebrating Jesus’s resurrection centuries ago. Piles of candy and dyed eggs are a decidedly modern phenomenon. As for how they became associated with Easter, we have the Germans to thank.

Related gallery: 10 Fun, Homemade Easter Basket Ideas the Whole Family Will Love.Provided by Reader's DigestTreat cartons: <p><a href='http://thecraftingchicks.com/2011/04/easy-tasty-easter-gift.html'>The Crafting Chicks</a> offer an ingenious way to recycle egg cartons in this Easter basket idea. Pour candies straight into carton cups (opened plastic eggs contain smaller sweets) and close the lid. Kids will love opening it up to find their surprise. Try these other <a href='http://www.rd.com/family/6-creative-easter-basket-ideas/'>Easter basket ideas for every type of personality</a>.</p> 10 Fun, Homemade Easter Basket Ideas the Whole Family Will Love

People Are Struggling to Find the Hidden Bunny in This Colorful Easter-Themed Puzzle — Can You Spot It?

  People Are Struggling to Find the Hidden Bunny in This Colorful Easter-Themed Puzzle — Can You Spot It? For Easter this year, online retailer Lenstore UK created a spring-inspired image with flowers, Easter eggs, and a hidden bunny. See if you can spot it.There's a special joy in solving hidden object puzzles that are designed to trick you.

Theories abound, but most experts agree that the word Easter derives from Eostre, a pagan goddess of spring and fertility.

“Many scholars believe that Easter had its origins as an early Anglo-Saxon festival that celebrated the goddess Eostre, and the coming of spring, in a sense a resurrection of nature after winter,” Carole Levin, Professor of History and Director of the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program at the University of Nebraska, told Time. “Eggs were part of the celebration of Eostre. Apparently eggs were eaten at the festival and also possibly buried in the ground to encourage fertility.”

Easter Candy, ranked from better to worst

  Easter Candy, ranked from better to worst Craving a Cadbury Egg? Enjoy it, be done with it and get back on track. 'Tis the season for dyeing Easter eggs — and snacking on chocolate ones. Worried you'll wreck your healthy eating streak come Easter Sunday? Well, because your favorite pastel-packaged spring candies wouldn't exactly be classified as health food, consider this permission to live a little!Know that term "in moderation?" That's how we should treat Easter, says Jessica Levinson, R.D.N., C.D.N., culinary nutrition expert. "If we restrict ourselves and don't have any of the candy, then we feel deprived and may end up overdoing it at some point.

According to Anglo-Saxon folklore, Eostre found a bird dying from the cold and transformed it into a rabbit so its fur would keep it warm—but that rabbit still laid eggs like a bird.

This is where the baskets come in. Sometime around the early 1600s, German Protestants began believed (or simply telling their children) that a hare—a popular pagan symbol of fertility and springtime—would place colored eggs in improvised “nests”—bonnets, hats, baskets, etc.—they would leave out overnight. According to Chowhound, Osterhase (or Easter Hare) would lay the eggs, but only for well-behaved children.

Pennsylvania Dutch settlers later brought the tradition to America, where its popularity exploded during the Victorian era. Eventually, the Osterhase or Oschter Haws became the Easter Bunny, and the baskets became receptacles for candy, toys and plastic eggs that we so enjoy.

Related video: How to Make a Living Easter Basket. Provided by Hallmark Channel

Kate Middleton Loves Making This Homemade Meal With George & Charlotte .
Kate Middleton Loves Making This Homemade Meal With George & Charlotte  Kate Middleton's Snaps of Charlotte's First School Day Are Instagram Gold

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!