Opinion Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nod is part of conservatives' master plan

21:11  10 july  2018
21:11  10 july  2018 Source:   nbcnews.com

Trump mulls Supreme Court choice from 2 or 3 candidates

  Trump mulls Supreme Court choice from 2 or 3 candidates President Donald Trump is mulling his choice for Supreme Court justice. The president, who is at his private golf club in New Jersey, says he has narrowed his choice to "three or two." Ahead of a Monday night announcement from the East Room in the White House, the president told reporters he was focused on four people and "of the four people I have it down to three or two." He was having dinner Friday night with Vice President Mike Pence, who has also been meeting with the finalists.

President Trump' s choice of Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy is intended to move what is already one of history' s most conservative courts to even more consistent right-of-center outcomes.

The DC appeals court judge, 53, worked for Ken Starr’ s Bill Clinton inquiry and George W Bush’ s White House.

Image: Trump Announces His Nominee To Succeed Anthony Kennedy On U.S. Supreme CourtU.S. Circuit Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh looks on as President Donald Trump introduces him as his nominee to the Supreme Court on July 9. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: Trump Announces His Nominee To Succeed Anthony Kennedy On U.S. Supreme CourtU.S. Circuit Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh looks on as President Donald Trump introduces him as his nominee to the Supreme Court on July 9.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

President Trump's announcement that he will nominate Brett Kavanaugh to replace the recently retired Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court will not only have a major impact on American law. It also demonstrates the binding power of the conservative legal movement that has pushed the federal courts to the right for decades, while also drawing Donald Trump ever closer to the Republican Party for the last two years.

Trump to tap federal appeals court Judge Brett Kavanaugh for Supreme Court

  Trump to tap federal appeals court Judge Brett Kavanaugh for Supreme Court Last year, Trump created similar suspense when he revealed Neil Gorsuch as his nominee. That prime-time announcement garnered more than 30 million viewers.WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Monday will nominate Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge in Washington to succeed Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court.

After accepting President Trump' s nomination to the Supreme Court , Brett Kavanaugh spoke about the Constitution. USA TODAY.

How appropriate that President Donald Trump’ s announcement of his Supreme Court nominee preempted part of ABC’ s The Bachelorette. If confirmed, Kavanaugh would replace Anthony Kennedy, the conservative who sided with progressive appointees to form a slim majority affirming

Trump, of course, has generally been impulsive on policy and independent from the Republican leadership on a variety of issues from sanctions on Russia to trade policy. But on judges he has been the ultimate party man, effectively delegating his choice to conservative legal activists. His willing acquiescence to their wishes on what could arguably be one of the few lasting achievements of his presidency reflects how important control of the courts is to both Republican public officials and voters.

Polls have shown that power over the Supreme Court nominees was critical to getting Republicans who had misgivings about Trump's fitness for office to the polls — he issued two lists of conservative judges pleasing to activists over the course of the 2016 campaign — and they've also been an important reason for Republican members of Congress to refuse to provide meaningful oversight on an unprecedentedly corrupt president. Trump's selection of orthodox conservatives to the courts reflects his understanding of this dynamic.

McConnell to meet with Trump's Supreme Court pick Tuesday

  McConnell to meet with Trump's Supreme Court pick Tuesday Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) will meet with Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's Supreme Court pick, on Tuesday as he begins to build support on Capitol Hill. Kavanaugh will meet with McConnell and Vice President Pence at 11:15 a.m., according to guidance from the White House. The meeting comes after Trump announced on Monday night that he would nominate Kavanaugh-currently a judge on the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit- to succeed retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.

By Lawrence Hurley. WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump on Monday announced Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee for the U. S . Supreme Court , picking a conservative federal appeals court judge who survived a previous tough Senate confirmation battle and helped investigate Democratic

President Donald Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh for the U. S . Supreme Court on Monday as he aimed to entrench its conservative control for years to come, but the federal appeals court judge faces a tough confirmation fight in the bitterly divided Senate.

And, to that end, the immensely influential conservative legal activist Leonard Leo took a leave from his position as executive vice president of the Federalist Society to personally work with Trump to pick federal judges.

Kavanaugh is what you would expect of a Federalist nominee. He is certainly able and experienced: Educated at Yale Law School, he once clerked for Justice Kennedy and served for more than a decade on the nation's second-most powerful court, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Santorum on Kavanaugh: Trump bowed to Washington elite

  Santorum on Kavanaugh: Trump bowed to Washington elite Rick Santorum said Monday that President Donald Trump "bowed to the elite in Washington" by picking Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his Supreme Court nominee. "Well, I think that Donald Trump said he was going to energize the base with this pick. I don't think he did that," the Republican former Pennsylvania senator and CNN political commentator told Chris Cuomo on CNN's "Cuomo PrimeTime." Kavanaugh has been dubbed a Washington insider, having worked in both Bush administrations, and is currently a judge on the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia circuit.

President Trump’ s choice of Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy is intended to move what is already one of history’ s most conservative courts to even more consistent right-of-center outcomes.

WASHINGTON — President Trump’ s selection of Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court on Monday culminates a three-decade project unparalleled in American history to install a reliable conservative majority on the nation’ s highest tribunal

And he is not only of a very conservative legal bent, he has taken a view of executive power that Trump is sure to find pleasing. In a 2012 law review article, he suggested that Congress should consider a law forbidding the president not merely from prosecution but even from being investigated while in office. "Criminal investigations take the President's focus away from his or her responsibilities to the people," Kavanaugh argued. "And a President who is concerned about an ongoing criminal investigation is almost inevitably going to do a worse job as President."

And yet, Kavanaugh is not likely to have a Supreme Court voting record meaningfully different from the other top contenders, such as Amy Coney Barrett, Thomas Hardiman, Raymond Kethledge. Trump had a deep group of reliably conservative judges to choose from — and that was no accident. It's the product of decades of conservative activism.

The most important player is the conservative legal movement is the Federalist Society, created in 1982 to counter the perceived liberal bias of law schools. It has become a well-funded and hugely influential organization, transforming itself into the go-to group that conservative would-be judges need by their side. Important scholarly books by political scientists Amanda Hollis-Brusky and Steven Teles have shown how the organization influenced a generation of conservative judges and legal scholars, and provides the information Republican presidents on which now rely on to pick federal judges.

Donald Trump says he did not discuss abortion with Brett Kavanaugh

  Donald Trump says he did not discuss abortion with Brett Kavanaugh President Donald Trump praises Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, while Democrats plan to oppose him over the abortion issue."No, I haven't, I really haven't," Trump told reporters as he left the White House for a week-long trip to Europe.

President Donald Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh for the U. S . Supreme Court on Monday as he aimed to entrench its conservative control for years to come, but the federal appeals court judge faces a tough confirmation fight in the bitterly divided Senate.

Brett Kavanaugh ’ s confirmation as a Supreme Court Justice will depend on partisan polarization You have to figure that a smart conservative like Kavanaugh mastered the art of over abuses of executive powers by the Bush White House, where Kavanaugh was an important part of the legal help.

Consider, for example, the case of Jeffrey Sutton: The 6th Circuit judge and former clerk of Justice Antonin Scalia has long been highly regarded by conservatives and is only 57, making him a potentially stellar nominee for Kennedy's seat. But he was apparently not even seriously considered by Trump. As USC School of Law Professor Orin Kerr has pointed out, the reason for Sutton losing favor among conservative legal activists is almost certainly his opinion upholding the Affordable Care Act from the constitutional challenge that nearly succeeded in 2012. The decision is not a strong indication of liberalism - circuit courts are bound by Supreme Court decisions even if they disagree with them, and Judge Sutton simply felt himself bound by a decision in a similar case in 2003, which was also joined by two Republican nominees. (The 2003 case so clearly indicated that the ACA was constitutional that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg repeatedly cited Justice Scalia's concurrence in that case in her own opinion.)

A Worthy Pick

  A Worthy Pick President Trump’s new nominee for the Supreme Court is a whip-smart legal conservative. As a judge in the highest-profile appeals court in the nation, he has shown an exemplary dedication to the rule of law. He has defended the separation of powers against threats coming from multiple directions. He has repeatedly cautioned his colleagues on the bench not to attempt to play a legislative role. He has also insisted on enforcing constitutional structures of accountability on government agencies.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh , tapped by President DOnald Trump to fill a key Supreme Court vacancy, has demonstrated his conservative credentials In 2012, Kavanaugh was part of a panel that scrapped an Environmental Protection Agency measure aimed at reducing air pollution in the United States.

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U. S ., July 9, 2018. Kavanaugh has shown conservative credentials on gun rights and in abortion-related cases. Last October, he was part of a panel of judges that issued an order

That opinion didn't reveal Sutton as a closet liberal. But for conservative legal activists, one non-party-line opinion in a high-profile case is enough. They wanted someone who will follow a straight political line, regardless of where it stands in terms of jurisprudence. Kavanaugh, like the other judges on Trump's shortlist, definitely fits the bill.

So when someone like the Federalist Society's Leo says it's "scare-mongering" to say that Kavanaugh will vote to overrule Roe v. Wade and support many other conservative priorities (like crippling the federal regulatory state and neutering the Voting Rights Act), don't believe him. He's getting exactly in Kavanaugh, and every appointee, exactly what he wants. And he'll be among the conservatives cheering when he does.

Scott Lemieux is a lecturer in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington. He is the co-author of Judicial Review and Democratic Theory and contributes regularly to The Week, Reuters, and the New Republic.

Liberals attack Brett Kavanaugh for 'frat boy' name .
The latest line of attack from liberals against Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, is knocking the judge for his “frat boy”-sounding first name. “We'll be D***ED if we're going to let five MEN—including some frat boy named Brett—strip us of our hard-won bodily autonomy and reproductive rights,” the influential pro-choice organization NARAL tweeted Tuesday.Comedian Stephen Colbert of CBS’ “The Late Show” also mocked Kavanaugh’s name.“Now I don’t know much about Kavanaugh, but I’m skeptical because his name is Brett,” Colbert said during the monologue on his show Tuesday.

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