Politics GOP senator joins calls for ethics probe if Moore wins Senate election

01:00  08 december  2017
01:00  08 december  2017 Source:   The Hill

Polls: Majority of voters say Senate should expel Moore if he's elected

  Polls: Majority of voters say Senate should expel Moore if he's elected A majority of American voters say Alabama GOP candidate Roy Moore should be expelled from the Senate if he wins Tuesday's special election, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll.It's the second poll out Tuesday with such a result, finding a nearl y identical amount of support for the Senate expelling Moore compared to a Politico-Morning Consult poll released earlier in the day.Fully 6 in 10 American voters, 60 percent, say Moore should be expelled from the Senate should he win Tuesday's special election in Alabama, according to the Quinnipiac University poll.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Addison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnell GOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat McConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Brent Budowsky: A plea to Alabama voters MORE (R-Ky.) has also called for an immediate ethics investigation if Moore wins the

Sen . Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) said Thursday that if Roy Moore is elected to the Senate next week, there should be an ethics investigation into the sexual assault and misconduct TOPICS: Government; US: Alabama; US: North Carolina KEYWORDS: 115th; gop ; moore ; roymoore; senate ; thomtillis.

Listen: Alabama Senate race poses challenge for GOP, and today's latest news © Provided by The Hill Listen: Alabama Senate race poses challenge for GOP, and today's latest news Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) said Thursday that if Roy Moore is elected to the Senate next week, there should be an ethics investigation into the sexual assault and misconduct allegations against him.

Tillis said on Buzzfeed's "AM to DM" Twitter morning show that he thinks an investigation should take place before the chamber moves to expel Moore or take other action.

"We need to examine the facts and let those facts lead us where they may," he said.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has also called for an immediate ethics investigation if Moore wins the Alabama special election, while National Republican Senate Committee Chairman Cory Gardner (Colo.) has called for his expulsion from the Senate.

Alabama senator: 'Relieved' Moore lost Senate race

  Alabama senator: 'Relieved' Moore lost Senate race Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) said on Wednesday that he is "relieved" GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore lost the Alabama race and won't be representing the Republican party in Congress. "Relieved? Yes that's a good word. I'm relieved and I believe a lot of Republicans are relieved that Roy Moore and some of his people aren't the face of the Republican party," he told reporters when asked if he was feeling any relief over Tuesday's election results.He added that Moore losing allows the state to avoid someone "radioactive" and "controversial" as their senator.

to return to Senate next. week Former Hill staff calls . for mandatory harassment training Gaming. the odds of any GOP . tax bill getting signed into. that Alabama Senate candidate Roy. Moore will immediately face a. probe by the Senate Ethics . Committee if he wins the.

The chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, Sen . Cory Gardner, R-Colo., on Monday called on his fellow senators to expel Alabama Republican Roy Moore , if Moore wins a special election next month.

Moore faces allegations from nearly 10 women who say he pursued them as teenagers when he was in his 20s and 30s, including multiple women who say he assaulted them.

Tillis originally called for Moore to withdraw from the race and said Thursday that he still stands by that position, but added that until Moore is under the jurisdiction of the Senate, the decision is in the hands of Alabama voters.

"There's Supreme Court precedent to say that we really don't have the authority to deny him being seated," he said. "But we do have jurisdiction over members, and we use an ethics investigation and then we look at what remedies come from that."

Tillis also criticized colleagues who have stood by Moore on the basis that he will help advance the GOP agenda.

Trump, Hillary Clinton and others congratulate Doug Jones on Alabama victory

  Trump, Hillary Clinton and others congratulate Doug Jones on Alabama victory President Trump along with a slew of other politicians from both sides of the aisle reacted late Tuesday after Democratic Alabama Senate candidate Doug Jones beat out Republican Roy Moore in a special election. Trump congratulated Jones in a tweet on his “hard fought victory” and said Republicans will "have another shot at the seat in a very short period of time.”Hillary Clinton also took to Twitter to congratulate citizens of Alabama for electing a senator “who’ll make them proud.”“Tonight, Alabama voters elected a senator who'll make them proud,” Clinton tweeted.

On the other hand, the new- election -day scenario is probably the GOP 's best chance to get rid of Moore and keep the seat. 4) Moore wins , and the Senate GOP tries to expel him. "If he were to be sworn in, he would immediately be in a process before the Senate Ethics Committee," Majority

Too Many Requests. House speaker joins GOP chorus calling for Moore to quit.

"Anyone that would say, 'Yeah, he's got problems but he's a Republican vote' really ought to rethink whether or not they should be in this institution," he said.

President Trump threw his support behind Moore this week, saying that Alabama can't have a "liberal person" like Democratic challenger Doug Jones in the Senate.

Following Trump's endorsement, the Republican National Committee (RNC) reinstated its support of Moore, giving $170,000 to the Alabama Republican Party to help the campaign, after originally distancing itself from the candidate.

Gardner, the chairman of the Senate GOP's campaign arm, broke with Trump and the RNC on Thursday, saying "we will never" endorse Moore.

Also Thursday, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) repeated his calls for Moore to drop out of the campaign, regardless of polls showing a tight race with Jones.

"I think he should have dropped out," Ryan told reporters at his weekly news conference. "Just because the polling has changed doesn't change my opinion on that, so I stand by what I said before."


With Trump’s support, Moore could gain influence in Washington .
The polarizing candidate for Senate, who has been accused of making unwanted sexual advances toward teenage girls, has divided GOP senators.The divergent attitudes toward Moore, who has been accused of making unwanted sexual advances toward teenage girls when he was in his 30s, underscored how polarizing a figure he would be among his party's national leaders if he wins the Dec. 12 special election.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!