Politics Officials to draw name from bowl to decide election winner

15:20  04 january  2018
15:20  04 january  2018 Source:   ap.org

Virginia House Dems asking court to reconsider decision declaring race a tie

  Virginia House Dems asking court to reconsider decision declaring race a tie Democrat Shelly Simonds is calling on the Virginia Board of Elections to delay a drawing to randomly pick the winner of the tied race for a House of Delegates seat scheduled to take place on Wednesday, as she asks a circuit court to reconsider its recount on a single ballot.Simonds plans to argue that elections officials failed to properly follow state procedure in a recount, Simonds plans to argue that elections officials failed to properly follow state procedure in a recount, The Virginian-Pilot reported Tuesday, citing documents Simonds plans to file.

Now election officials are turning to a ceramic bowl . Although a drawing of names is scheduled for Thursday morning to determine who will occupy the seat in the 94th District, the loser could push for a second recount or ask the House to step in and pick a winner .

Virginia Republicans cheered Thursday when their candidate won a state House of Delegates race by luck of the draw , having his name chosen first out of ceramic bowl .

Election officials in Newport News, Va., examine ballots that a computer failed to scan during a recount for a House of Delegates race on Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017. © AP Photo/Ben Finley Election officials in Newport News, Va., examine ballots that a computer failed to scan during a recount for a House of Delegates race on Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017.

RICHMOND, Va. — There's no winner yet in Virginia's hotly contested race for a House seat despite a general election, a recount and a legal battle. Now election officials are turning to a ceramic bowl.

But even that may not be enough. Although a drawing of names is scheduled for Thursday morning to determine who will occupy the seat in the 94th District, the loser could push for a second recount or ask the House to step in and pick a winner.

A pilgrim hat, a poker game and a coin flip: 3 ways of settling tied elections

  A pilgrim hat, a poker game and a coin flip: 3 ways of settling tied elections Mayor Margaret Gentle stood before a room of residents and city employees in North Port, Fla., explaining why, after almost 15 years as their leader, she would be stepping down. Her re-election race had ended in a tie, with Gentle and her challenger, Frank Coulter, each receiving 1,554 votes. The city attorney determined that the race would be decided by a coin toss, but Gentle wouldn't stand for that. That, she said, would demean the voters of North Port, a city south of Tampa. "I will not in any way participate in a coin flip for the highest office of this city," Gentle said that day in 1987. "I won't degrade the office.

Now election officials are turning to a ceramic bowl . Although a drawing of names is scheduled for Thursday morning to determine who will occupy the seat in the 94th District, the loser could push for a second recount or ask the House to step in and pick a winner .

Now election officials are turning to a ceramic bowl . Although a drawing of names is scheduled for Thursday morning to determine who will occupy the seat in the 94th District, the loser could push for a second recount or ask the House to step in and pick a winner .

Republican incumbent David Yancey indicated that he could take such a step if he loses, refusing a proposal from opponent Democrat Shelly Simonds on Wednesday that both sides accept the name drawing as final.

Yancey said he was "not going to deny myself or the people of the 94th district due process." A delay on settling the winner could allow Republicans to start the 2018 legislative session next week at a 50-49 majority, which would let them pick a speaker and set committee assignments.

At a meeting on Capitol Square, the state elections board will print the name of each candidate on a piece of paper, place each paper into a separate film canister, and place the canisters into a cobalt-blue-and-white ceramic bowl made by a local artist. The winner will be then be picked in a blind draw.

Virginia officials postpone draw to decide tied statehouse election

  Virginia officials postpone draw to decide tied statehouse election A drawing of lots to settle a tied Virginia legislative race that could shift the statehouse balance of power will be postponed, election officials in the U.S. state said on Tuesday, after the Democrat candidate mounted a legal fight. The decision to put off the high-stakes lotto, originally scheduled for Wednesday, marks the latest twist in a dramatic election recount that at one point showed Democrat Shelly Simonds beating Republican incumbent David Yancey by a single vote. No new draw date was immediately set.

– A Virginia elections official reached into an artsy stoneware bowl , pulled out a name and declared Republican David Yancey the winner of a House of Delegates race that could determine which The spectacle drew national attention as an odd way to decide a highly consequential contest.

officials - to - draw - name - from - bowl - to - decide - election - winner A Virginia legislative election that could determine which party controls the House of is set to be decided by chance after an election , a recount and a legal battle all failed to determine a winner Thu, 04 Jan 2018 16:09:50 UTC en.

The drawing will be the latest dramatic twist in a November election that saw Democrats wipe out a 66-34 advantage held by Republicans in the House. If Simonds wins, the partisan split will be 50-50. If Yancey wins, Republicans will have a 51-49 majority.

Adding another wrinkle: The Newport News seat is not the only contested House race. Democrats have filed a legal challenge in a close Fredericksburg-area race in which several voters were given the wrong ballots. A hearing in that case is set for Friday.

Partisans on both sides have different opinions of what state law allows in terms of another recount. After Yancey rejected her proposal to accept the drawing results as final, Simonds said she wouldn't rule out asking for one herself.

"I'm not prepared to give up," she said. "All options are on the table as far as I'm concerned."

Simonds appeared to have lost on Election Day by 10 votes, but on Dec. 19, she won a recount by a single vote. The next day, a three-judge panel in Newport News declared a tie based on a previously uncounted vote for Yancey. Simonds asked the judges to reconsider, but on Wednesday the panel denied her request in strident terms, saying "the right of a citizen to cast a free vote has been secured to us by the blood of patriots."

"The manifest injustice against which we must always guard is the chance that a single vote may not be counted," the judges wrote.

At the heart of the dispute in the race for a seat in the oldest legislative body in the country is a single ballot on which the voter filled in the bubble for both Simonds and Yancey. The voter also drew a single slash through the bubble for Simonds and picked Republican candidates in statewide races.

The ballot wasn't counted during the recount and was identified after a Republican election official raised concerns the following day.

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