Politics Senators say they are 'close' to a deal on DACA, border security

04:38  11 january  2018
04:38  11 january  2018 Source:   NBC News

Senate Republicans to meet with Trump Thursday on DACA

  Senate Republicans to meet with Trump Thursday on DACA A group of Senate Republicans are expected to meet with President Trump at the White House on Thursday as they try to get on the same page ahead of a looming fight over immigration. "We're supposed to meet at the White House tomorrow, a number of Senate Judiciary Committee members, to talk more about DACA because everybody is trying to figure out what the path forward is," Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) told reporters on Wednesday.The meeting comes as Democrats are angling to include a deal on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program as part of a mid-January showdown to fund the government and avoid across-the-board budget caps.

Key GOP senators tell The Hill that a bipartisan Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals ( DACA ) compromise is "very close " but both sides must convince their respective colleagues to back a Give Trump 33B for wall/ border security , limit sponsorship of DREAMers, and end DV: sounds like a deal .

Key GOP senators tell The Hill that a bipartisan Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals ( DACA ) compromise is "very close " but both sides must convince their respective colleagues to back a narrowly focused deal . Many of them indicate that a deal would include some border security - but, Flake

Image: President Donald Trump, center, speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White HousePresident Donald Trump, center, speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington on Jan. 10, 2018, as Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, fromt left, Secretary of state Rex Tillerson, Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, listen. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: President Donald Trump, center, speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White HousePresident Donald Trump, center, speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington on Jan. 10, 2018, as Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, fromt left, Secretary of state Rex Tillerson, Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, listen.

WASHINGTON — One day after a televised meeting between nearly two dozen lawmakers and President Donald Trump, a group of bipartisan senators say they are increasingly optimistic about a deal on a handful of immigration issues that include border security and a solution on the future of thousands of undocumented immigrants currently caught in legal limbo.

Confusion over Trump's border wall delays spending talks

  Confusion over Trump's border wall delays spending talks Senate negotiators say a lack of clarity from President Trump about his plans for a proposed wall along the U.S.-Mexico border is holding up talks to avoid a government shutdown. Trump has demanded tougher immigration controls and more border-security measures in return for relief for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program recipients in the 2018 spending bill. But Republicans and Democrats working on a possible immigration deal said Wednesday they're still waiting to receive Trump's specific demands for tighter border security to hash out a deal.

Both Republican and Democratic senators said a deal would include measures to improve border security , something which Republicans have repeatedly Trump’s Democratic predecessor, President Barack Obama, created DACA by executive order. “ We ’ re still working we ’ re very close ” to an

19 to fund the government through September, could push federal agencies closer to a shutdown. Deal downplayed. But he added that bipartisan negotiations continue among senators . Democrats have said they are open to tying DACA to additional funding for border security technology.

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., one of the six members working on a deal, said Wednesday morning that they are "close" to an agreement. After an afternoon meeting with a group working on the deal, Flake emerged saying they "are closer."

"We're very close on the four categories that we outlined," Flake said, adding that a deal could be announced as early as this week.

"I feel very positive we're moving in the right direction," Senator Dick Durbin, D-Ill., the lead Democrat in the talks, noted.

The proposal would address the nearly 800,000 undocumented immigrants who have been given protected immigration status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — or DACA — program. Trump gave Congress until March 5th or their protection would expire. The agreement is also expected to include additional border security, minor changes to family-based migration, and drastic changes to the diversity visa lottery program.

Trump to meet Republican senators on immigration

  Trump to meet Republican senators on immigration Key Republican senators will meet with President Donald Trump at the White House on Thursday as negotiations continue to reach a compromise on DACATrump is set to host the more conservative members of his party negotiating with Democrats in the Senate over DACA, an Obama administration policy that protected young undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children from deportation.

Republican senators returned to the Capitol Building saying the conversation with Trump “narrowed” negotiations to four factors: the legal status of DACA recipients, border security , family-based Trump isn’t one for making those difficult decisions — and Congress isn’t any closer to a deal .

Republican and Democratic senators working on an immigration deal say they are closing in on an agreement combining a border - security package with The protections for the young immigrants covered by DACA have been up in the air throughout the first year of Donald Trump’s presidency.

The group, consisting of Sens. Durbin, Flake, Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Cory Gardner, R-Colo., Michael Bennet, D-Colo. and Bob Menendez, D-N.J., says their proposal should be able to obtain 60 votes in the Senate.

However, immigration legislation has been much harder to pass in the House over the last decade, and members there have had some complaints about the substance of the current negotiations in the Senate. "I understand that they've taken the kids hostage. There's no other way to look at this," Rep. Luis Gutierrez. D-Ill. said about the negotiations. "But tell me what the ransom is. Stop changing the terms of their freedom."

The progress senators expressed hope for comes after a unique meeting with Trump on Tuesday, nearly an hour of which was televised. Even after the meeting, it remained unclear where the president stood on some of the key issues but members on both sides of the aisle said that the gathering helped move stalled talks forward by narrowing the parameters of any legislation.

Trump: Border wall must be part of any DACA deal

  Trump: Border wall must be part of any DACA deal President Donald Trump pressed for action on immigration Thursday, saying "our current immigration system fails Americans" and advocating for his infamous wall on the Southern Border. "Any legislation on DACA must secure the border with a wall," the president said, flanked by Republican senators who came to the White House for a meeting on the subject. He also demanded future legislation further restrict visa overstays and so-called "chain migration," and end the visa lottery — which Trump still incorrectly describes as names being picked out of a "hopper" at random.

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump on Thursday said he was “fairly close ” to a deal with congressional leaders to preserve protections for young immigrants living illegally in America, and is insisting on “massive border security ” as part of any agreement.

President Donald Trump said yesterday that he was close to a deal with Democratic the best ways to address illegal immigration through strong border security and interior enforcement, DACA Trump also endorsed US Senator Luther Strange in an election fight in Alabama against a hardline

Still unclear is what the president will accept when it comes to his much-touted border wall. After Tuesday's meeting, many legislators said that Trump signaled a willingness to back away from what some envision as a 2,000 mile continuous wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

"That helps for those who have envisioned this big concrete brick and mortar wall. It's different. So that's easier for the other side to accept," Flake said.

But the president has not been clear on what he would accept and during a Wednesday news conference with Erna Solberg, the prime minister of Norway, he said any legislation must include the wall.

"It's got to include the wall. We need the wall for security; we need the wall for safety; we need the wall for stopping the drugs from pouring in," Trump said.

Senate negotiators, however, are working off of Trump's description of the wall in the meeting. A deal is expected to include authorization for about $1.6 billion of funding for about 700 miles worth of fencing for various spots along the border.

In addition to border security, other points of negotiation include the how to address the Dreamers, undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. Sen. Durbin was adamant that any deal include a path to citizenship for all Dreamers, not just those who applied for the DACA program.

The six senators are also discussing family-based immigration, also referred to as "chain migration." Negotiators wanted to keep discussions narrow and discussions revolve around prohibiting Dreamers from being able to provide their parents a path to citizenship but instead protected status.

And finally, they are discussing eliminating the diversity visa lottery, which allows 50,000 slots for people to apply to emigrate to the U.S., and giving those slots to immigrants already in the U.S. with protected status, including those from El Salvador and Haiti whose protected status was eliminated. The Congressional Black Caucus is expected to oppose any end to the diversity visa, however, because it would end most immigration from Africa.

Arpaio on DACA recipients: 'Deport them' .
Former Arizona county sheriff Joe Arpaio said he thinks recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program should be deported. "Deport them," Arpaio told NPR's "Morning Edition" in an interview airing Thursday morning."When we come across these kids, or some are older than just kids," Arpaio said, "then deport them. You deport them back to the country they came from."Arpaio said that DACA recipients have education in the U.S. and can be "good ambassadors from the United States to their country.""That's just my idea," he said during the interview.

Source: http://us.pressfrom.com/news/politics/-111973-senators-say-they-are-close-to-a-deal-on-daca-border-security/

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