Politics McConnell Joins Ryan in Walking Back False Promise on Tax Bill

00:52  11 november  2017
00:52  11 november  2017 Source:   Bloomberg

Mitch McConnell says Senate GOP will release its tax proposal on Friday

  Mitch McConnell says Senate GOP will release its tax proposal on Friday McConnell said the Senate will aim to mark up, or debate and amend, the tax bill next week.

Bloomberg) -- The top Republicans in the House and Senate have now walked back false promises about their tax bills ’ impact on the middle class. McConnell joins House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin in walking back their statements on taxes .

The top Republicans in the House and Senate have now walked back false promises about their tax bills ’ impact on the middle class. McConnell joins House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin in walking back their statements on taxes .

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky, pauses after speaking during a news conference on a unified tax reform framework at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. President Donald Trump and congressional leaders are rolling out a framework for a tax overhaul that would condense the existing seven tax rates to three, and cut the top rate to 35 percent from 39.6 percent.: House GOP Hold News Conference After Tax Reform Retreat © Bloomberg/Bloomberg House GOP Hold News Conference After Tax Reform Retreat

(Bloomberg) -- The top Republicans in the House and Senate have now walked back false promises about their tax bills’ impact on the middle class.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell acknowledged to The New York Times Friday he erred when he said in an MSNBC appearance last week that "nobody in the middle class is going to get a tax increase."

Now the Kentucky Republican says every income group would see a tax cut -- on average.

“You can’t guarantee that absolutely no one sees a tax increase,” he told the newspaper.

McConnell joins House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin in walking back their statements on taxes. Ryan had said in a radio interview Wednesday, "So actually, even though there’s a lot of false information out there, everybody gets a tax cut."

Ryan: Roy Moore allegations 'disqualifying if true'

  Ryan: Roy Moore allegations 'disqualifying if true' Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) responded to allegations of sexual misconduct against Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore (R) on Thursday, saying the allegations are "disqualifying if true." "These allegations are disqualifying if true. Anyone who would do this to a child has no place in public office, let alone the United States Senate," Ryan said in a statement.In a bombshell report in The Washington P ost on Thursday, Moore was accused of having inappropriate sexual conduct with a 14-year-old girl in 1979 when he was 32.Leigh Corfman, now 53, said Moore asked for her phone number and the pair met later on two separate occasions.

Business Insider - Both Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell admitted they made mistakes talking about the impact of their respective tax reform bills .. Now they’re walking back that claim.

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That statement was false, as there are millions of people who would face higher tax bills from the loss of deductions like the one for state and local taxes, which is rolled back in the House bill and eliminated entirely in the Senate bill.

A day later, Ryan’s language changed.

"At every income level, there is a tax cut for the average family," Ryan said in a statement Thursday, citing a study by the Joint Committee on Taxation.

AshLee Strong, a Ryan spokeswoman, told The Washington Post that he misspoke.

(Updates with quote from Donald Trump in ninth paragraph.)

To contact the reporter on this story: Jason Koutsoukis in Singapore at jkoutsoukis2@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Rosalind Mathieson at rmathieson3@bloomberg.net, Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net.

©2017 Bloomberg L.P.

Republicans Search for Proof Their Tax Plans Will Pay for Themselves .
House and Senate Republican leaders, surrounded by analyses that suggest their plans will increase the deficit, are shopping for forecasts that say they won’t.WASHINGTON — Republican leaders keep insisting that their plans to cut taxes by $1.5 trillion over the next decade will not add to the national debt — yet economic analyses of the Senate and House proposals keep predicting that the plans will do just that.

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