Politics Senators to review president's nuclear strike powers

17:37  14 november  2017
17:37  14 november  2017 Source:   USA TODAY

Senators to review president's nuclear strike powers

  Senators to review president's nuclear strike powers Just a month after he warned that President Trump may be setting the nation on the path to World War III, Sen. Bob Corker will preside Tuesday over a hearing that will examine the president’s authority to launch a nuclear strike. The hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee will mark the first time in more than four decades that the panel or its House counterpart has specifically reviewed the issue of the president’s powers to order a nuclear attack.“This discussion is long overdue,” said Corker, the Tennessee Republican who called the hearing as chairman of the Senate committee.

Senators to review president ' s nuclear strike powers . As commander-in-chief, the president has the sole authority to order a nuclear strike . While existing procedures call for the president to consult first with military and civilian leaders, the final decision rests with him.

Senators to review president ' s nuclear strike powers . Bob Corker will preside Tuesday over a hearing that will examine the president ’ s authority to launch a nuclear strike .

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., attends a hearing Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Corker, who is locked in a war of words with Trump, said Tuesday the president is degrading the country by “standing up in front of the American people and stating untruths that everybody knows to be untrue.” © J. Scott Applewhite / AP Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., attends a hearing Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Corker, who is locked in a war of words with Trump, said Tuesday the president is degrading the country by “standing up in front of the American people and stating untruths that everybody knows to be untrue.”

WASHINGTON — Just a month after he warned that President Trump may be setting the nation on the path to World War III, Sen. Bob Corker will preside Tuesday over a hearing that will examine the president’s authority to launch a nuclear strike.

Trump’s nuclear authority divides senators alarmed by his ‘volatile’ behavior

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WASHINGTON -- If President Barack Obama feels the need to launch a military strike against Iran' s nuclear program, Congress will back him, a group of Still, the senators insisted a tougher stand is required with leaders like Iran' s . "They're not building a nuclear power plant for peaceful purposes.

The hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee will mark the first time in more than four decades that the panel or its House counterpart has specifically reviewed the issue of the president’s powers to order a nuclear attack.

“This discussion is long overdue,” said Corker, the Tennessee Republican who called the hearing as chairman of the Senate committee.

The hearing comes as Trump continues to trade insults with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un and amid concerns by some members of Congress about the executive branch’s authority to wage war, particularly with nuclear weapons.

“The committee is clearly looking for remedies to ensure that a demented president could not unilaterally start a nuclear conflagration,” said Bruce Blair, an expert on nuclear command and control and a research scholar at the Program of Science and Global Security at Princeton University.

Could anyone stop Trump from launching nukes? The answer: No

  Could anyone stop Trump from launching nukes? The answer: No <p>Here's a question rarely raised before Donald Trump ran for the White House: If the president ordered a pre-emptive nuclear strike, could anyone stop him?</p>The answer is no.

Acting President ; otherwise, the President shall resume the powers and duties of his office. More practically, though (as observed in other answers), if the President were to randomly walk into the Situation Room and unexpectedly order a nuclear strike , the Commander of USSTRATCOM would

President Donald Trump issued an implicit warning to North Korea Wednesday morning, tweeting the U. S . nuclear arsenal is “far stronger and more powerful ” than it ever has been. A day after warning the United States would hit the North with “fire and fury” if Pyongyang repeated threats that it would strike

As commander-in-chief, the president has the sole authority to order a nuclear strike. While existing procedures call for the president to consult first with military and civilian leaders, the final decision rests with him.

“No one can veto the president’s decision,” said Blair, co-founder of Global Zero, an international movement for the elimination of nuclear weapons.

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Some members of Congress are pushing for a check on the president’s powers.

Bills filed in January by Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., and Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., would prohibit the president from launching a preemptive nuclear strike without a declaration of war by Congress. Neither piece of legislation has gained any traction in the Republican-controlled Congress.

No one can prevent Trump from using nuclear weapons, experts say

  No one can prevent Trump from using nuclear weapons, experts say A system of checks and balances exists to prevent a U.S. president from illegally ordering a nuclear strike, but no one can stop the commander in chief from using nuclear weapons, according to senior military experts and a former vice president.&nbsp;"If President Trump were to decide that it's time to put (North Korean leader) Kim Jong Un in his place once and for all, he would choose a plan that already exists. And it would be almost impossible in my view to override a decision to implement that option," Bruce G. Blair, a former nuclear missile launch officer and co-founder of the Global Zero group that advocates eliminating nuclear weapons, told USA TODAY on Sunday.

The hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee will mark the first time in more than four decades that the panel or its House counterpart has specifically reviewed the issue of the president ’ s powers to As commander-in-chief, the president has the sole authority to order a nuclear strike .

But Trump’s aggressive approach toward North Korea continues to raise fears that his rhetoric might backfire and further inflame tensions. Trump threatened in August to unleash “fire and fury like the world has never seen” in response to reports that the communist regime had developed a warhead that could be mounted on a ballistic missile.

In an interview with The New York Times, Corker, Trump’s most outspoken Republican critic in Congress, accused Trump of undermining diplomacy efforts by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and warned that the president’s actions could set the nation on the path to World War III.

Blair said the president’s authority to order a nuclear strike is ripe for review in Congress not only because of Trump’s confrontational stance toward North Korea, but also because of a surge in the number of ballistic missiles held by other countries and because nuclear protocols are so outdated that they are “dysfunctional for purposes of responding to an attack.”

With North Korea, China, India and Pakistan all mass producing ballistic missiles, it has become harder to gauge whether a missile launch is just a test or a legitimate threat to the United States and its allies, he said.

Europe urges US Congress not to torpedo Iran deal

  Europe urges US Congress not to torpedo Iran deal EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini warned Tuesday that the Iran nuclear deal can never be renegotiated, as she urged US lawmakers not to try to reopen the agreement. Her visit coincided with that of the head of the UN nuclear watchdog, IAEA director general Yukiya Amano, who defended his agency's ability to monitor Iran's compliance with the accord.President Donald Trump has told Congress that he can no longer "certify" that the 2015 accord is in the US national interest, leaving its fate in the hands of skeptical senators.

Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) and Representative Ted Lieu (D-CA) have introduced the Restricting First Use of Nuclear Weapons Act of 2017, which would prohibit the president from launching a first nuclear strike without a declaration of war by Congress.

Two leading policy experts have called for Congress to amend the War Powers Act to ensure the president cannot launch a nuclear strike on his own authority. He’ s not the first senator to do so, suggesting that the time for a legislative remedy is here.

“We’re living in a grey zone that makes this protocol all the more important, not only from the standpoint of responding to an attack but also giving the president an opportunity to make a decision when the evidence is ambiguous,” he said.

Outdated technology also has made it difficult at times to set up a conference with the people who are supposed to advise the president on such decisions, Blair said.

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At Tuesday’s hearing, senators will hear from C. Robert Kehler, a retired Air Force general who served as commander of the United States Strategic Command; Peter D. Feaver, a political science and public policy professor at Duke University; and Brian McKeon, former acting under secretary for policy at the Defense Department.

The hearing is one in a series the committee is holding on war making and foreign policy. Last month, the panel examined whether it’s time to update the resolution authorizing the president to order the use of military force in foreign countries.

Corker said afterward that he expects the committee to take up a new military-force authorization resolution “fairly soon.”

At U.N., North Korea says U.S. to blame for 'worst ever situation' .
<p>North Korea complained to the United Nations on Monday about joint military exercises by the United State and South Korea, describing it as "the worst ever situation" because U.S. nuclear war equipment had been deployed ready to strike.</p>In a letter to U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, seen by Reuters, North Korean U.N. Ambassador Ja Song Nam said the United States was "running amok for war exercises by introducing nuclear war equipment in and around the Korean Peninsula.

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