Technology Bose: 'We don’t wiretap your communications'

19:56  21 april  2017
19:56  21 april  2017 Source:   USA TODAY

Bose Headphones Spies on Listeners: Suit

  Bose Headphones Spies on Listeners: Suit Data mining lawsuits are on the rise as a variety of electronic devices gather more and more information about users.According to the complaint, filed late Tuesday in the U.S. District Court in Chicago, the headphone company's Bose Connect app does more than just pair wireless headphones with the music in their devices — it also connects the user's entire listening history with third-party data mining companies.

CLOSE. Skip in Skip. X. Embed. X. Share. A new lawsuit alleges that Bose headphones spy on users by tracking their listening habits. Time. Headphone maker Bose says it will fight a lawsuit claiming its app collects user data and shares it with third parties without their permission.

"In the Bose Connect App, we don ' t wiretap your communications , we don ' t sell your information, and we don ' t use anything we collect to identify you - or anyone else - by name," she added.

 

Bose¨ QuietComfort¨ 35 Wireless headphones. © Best Buy Bose¨ QuietComfort¨ 35 Wireless headphones. Headphone maker Bose says it will fight a lawsuit claiming its app collects user data and shares it with third parties without their permission.

In a statement, Bose calls the allegations "inflammatory" and "misleading," denying the companion Connect app collects and shares information on users' music and audio choices.

"We don’t wiretap your communications, we don’t sell your information, and we don’t use anything we collect to identify you – or anyone else – by name," read an excerpt of Bose's statement. 

Earlier this week, a complaint filed in U.S. district court in Illinois alleged the Connect app, which can be used with several headphones sold by Bose, collects information on what audio or music users listen to, then shares it with third parties. The lawsuit claims the app shared this information with a data mining company.

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  Senators seek data on Americans caught up in surveillance <p>A Democratic privacy advocate and libertarian-minded Republican are asking the nation's top intelligence official to release more information about the communications of American citizens swept up in surveillance operations.</p>The request by Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon and GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky adds to a chorus of calls for more transparency about how intelligence agencies use and share communications to, from and about Americans.

The lawsuit accuses Bose of violating the Federal Wiretap Act, which prohibits the interception of communication ; the state of Illinois’ eavesdropping statute, which protects individuals from third parties intercepting private Bigger Bags Don ’ t Equal More Wise Potato Chips, Shocking Lawsuit Claims.

He is seeking class-action status on behalf of "tens of thousands" of projected Bose Connect users. His lawyers claim the app violates the federal Wiretap Act by eavesdropping on users while they're using their headphones, according to the Chicago Tribune.

"One’s personal audio selections – including music, radio broadcast, podcast, and lecture choices – provide an incredible amount of insight into his or her personality, behavior, political views, and personal identity," reads the complaint, which accuses Bose of violating the Federal Wiretap Act.

The plaintiff in the complaint is seeking class-action status, as well as undisclosed financial damages, and for Bose to stop collecting and sharing data without user permission.

Bose posted a statement on the company's website for users of the Connect app, pledging to fight the claims in court. "Nothing is more important to us than your trust," reads an excerpt. "We work tirelessly to earn and keep it, and have for over 50 years. That’s never changed, and never will."  

Follow Brett Molina on Twitter: @brettmolina23.

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The FBI used the dossier alleging Russian ties to President Trump's campaign associates to help convince a judge to grant a warrant to secretly monitor former campaign aide Carter Page, CNN reports.FBI Director James Comey has cited the dossier in some of his briefings with lawmakers in recent we eks as one of the information sources used by his bureau to bolster its probe, U.S. officials briefed on the investigation told CNN.The secret court that oversees the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) granted the FBI a warrant to monitor the communications of Page, a former national security adviser on Trump's campaign.

Source: http://us.pressfrom.com/news/science-and-technology/-42702-bose-we-don-t-wiretap-your-communications/

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