Sport Oklahoma RB Rodney Anderson 'unlikely' to be charged with sexual assault, report says

12:26  07 december  2017
12:26  07 december  2017 Source:   Sporting News

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Oklahoma running back Rodney Anderson and his legal team are not expecting him to be charged with sexual assault , The Daily Oklahoman reported Wednesday, citing unidentified sources.

Oklahoma starting running back Rodney Anderson is reportedly unlikely to face criminal charges as a result of the sexual assault allegations against him. A University of Oklahoma employee has accused Anderson of sexually assaulting her on Nov.

a person wearing a helmet: Rodney Anderson© (Getty Images) Rodney Anderson Oklahoma running back Rodney Anderson and his legal team are not expecting him to be charged with sexual assault, The Daily Oklahoman reported Wednesday, citing unidentified sources.

The Sooners' leading rusher was accused by a 23-year-old woman of raping her in the early hours of Nov. 16. The woman went to police this past weekend after she said she began recalling the events of the alleged attack. She filed a request for an emergency protective order Monday.

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Anderson, 21, has denied the accusations, and The Oklahoman reported that a charge is "unlikely," given the circumstances.

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  State, DHS respond to 223 women in national security field speaking out on sexual harassment Women who have worked in the national security field are speaking out about having been victims of sexual harassment, abuse or assault or knowing others who are victims . A State Department spokesperson said that the department is updating its sexual harassment training in the wake of recent scandals. "The Department has two anti-harassment policies: one prohibiting sexual or gender-based harassment, and the other prohibiting harassment based on other protected discriminatory bases of race, color, national origin, religion, disability, age, and genetic information," the spokesperson said.

Oklahoma starting running back Rodney Anderson is reportedly unlikely to face criminal charges as a result of the sexual assault allegations against him. A University of Oklahoma employee has accused Anderson of sexually assaulting her on Nov.

According to ESPN, a protective order has been filed against Oklahoma running back Rodney Anderson . The woman who filed the order says that Anderson sexually assaulted her on November 16. ESPN reports that Anderson has not been charged with any crimes as of this morning.

According to Anderson's attorney, Derek Chance, they have proof that the woman "attempted to pursue a relationship" after Nov. 16 and that Anderson "declined several social invitations" from her. These exchanges are in text messages between Anderson and the woman, Chance said.

At this point, Anderson has not been arrested or charged with a crime. Police said they were investigating the matter, and the University of Oklahoma was aware of the ongoing investigation.

On Tuesday, Anderson set up a Twitter account specifically to address the accusation, saying he was innocent.

Anderson hasn't been suspended from team activities. He is still expected to play when No. 2 Oklahoma travels to the Rose Bowl to face No. 3 Georgia in the semifinals of the College Football Playoff.

Americans Deny Harassment In Their Own Workplace .
Only 9 percent of Americans believe harassment could be an issue in their office.Only 9 percent of Americans believe that sexual harassment is a problem in their own workplace, but 80 percent say it is a problem in other workplaces, according to the NBC News/SurveyMonkey poll. The poll was published shortly after Today Show anchor Matt Lauer was fired for accusations of sexual harassment and abuse of female employees.

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