World Plastics Pile Up as China Refuses to Take the West’s Recycling

02:16  12 january  2018
02:16  12 january  2018 Source:   nytimes.com

Heavy snowfall shuts three China airports, delays at nine others

  Heavy snowfall shuts three China airports, delays at nine others At least three Chinese airports have been shut and nine others are experiencing extensive delays because of heavy snowfall, Chinese aviation data provider VariFlight said on Thursday. The national observatory put China's snow alert on its second-highest level this week, state news agency Xinhua said. Parts of the central, northern and eastern regions could see up to 30 cm (12 inches) of snow, it said.VariFlight said Hefei Xinqiao International Airport, Fuyang Xiguan Airport in eastern Anhui province, and Jining Qufu Airport in coastal Shandong province had been shut.

Officials in Britain and the West are scrambling to cope with growing piles of plastics like this one in China . Similar backups have been reported in Canada, Ireland, Germany and several other European nations, while tons of rubbish is piling up in port cities like Hong Kong.

Ever since China announced last year that it no longer wanted to be the “world’ s garbage dump,” recycling about half of the globe’ s plastics and Similar backups have been reported in Canada, Ireland, Germany and several other European nations, while tons of rubbish is piling up in port cities

LONDON — Ever since China announced last year that it no longer wanted to be the “world’s garbage dump,” recycling about half of the globe’s plastics and paper products, Western nations have been puzzling over what to do when the ban went into effect, which it did on Jan. 1.

Philippines to protest to China over apparent airbase on manmade island

  Philippines to protest to China over apparent airbase on manmade island The Philippines will make a diplomatic protest to China, which it described as reneging on a promise not to militarize artificial islands in the busy South China Sea waterway, the southeast Asian nation's defense minister said on Monday. The United States has criticized China's build-up of military facilities on the artificial islands and is concerned they could be used to restrict free movement through the key trade route.Philippine Defence Secretary Delfin Lorenzana's comment followed a Dec.

In Britain, Jacqueline O'Donovan, managing director of the British waste disposal firm, O'Donovan Waste Disposal, said that "the market has completely changed" since China ' s decision went into effect. Her company collects and disposes of about 70,000 tons of plastic trash every year, she said, and

Since Jan. 1, China has banned imports of 24 kinds of waste, including materials used in plastic bottles, in a campaign against “foreign garbage.”

The answer, to date, in Britain at least, is nothing. At least one waste disposal site in London is already seeing a buildup of plastic recyclables and has had to pay to have some of it removed.

Similar backups have been reported in Canada, Ireland, Germany and several other European nations, while tons of rubbish is piling up in port cities like Hong Kong.

Sign Up For the Morning Briefing Newsletter

Steve Frank, of Pioneer Recycling in Oregon, owns two plants that collect and sort 220,000 tons of recyclable materials each year. A majority of was until recently exported to China.

“My inventory is out of control,” he said.

China’s ban, Mr. Frank said, has caused “a major upset of the flow of global recyclables.” Now, he said, he is hoping to export waste to countries like Indonesia, India, Vietnam, Malaysia — “anywhere we can” — but “they can’t make up the difference.”

Japan says China sent nuclear-powered sub to disputed isles

  Japan says China sent nuclear-powered sub to disputed isles Japan said Monday that a Chinese naval submarine spotted in waters off flashpoint islands in the East China Sea was one of its new type of nuclear-powered attack vessels. Load Error Tokyo's statement comes on the same day that China announced three of its "Coast Guard vessels conducted a patrol in territorial waters off the Diaoyu Islands," Beijing's name for the contested isles called Senkaku in Japan.Japan launched an official protest last Thursday after their navy spotted the 4,000-tonne Jiangkai II class frigate and an unidentified submarine in waters surrounding the Tokyo-administered islands.

LONDON (NYTIMES) - Ever since China announced last year that it no longer wanted to be the "world' s garbage dump," recycling about half the globe' s plastics and paper products, Western nations have been puzzling over what to do when the ban went into effect

LONDON — Ever since China announced last year that it no longer wanted to be the “world’ s garbage dump,” recycling about half the globe’ s plastics and paper products, Western nations have been puzzling over what to do when the ban went into effect, which it did on Jan 1.

In Britain, Jacqueline O’Donovan, managing director of the British waste disposal firm, O’Donovan Waste Disposal, said that “the market has completely changed” since China’s decision went into effect. Her company collects and disposes about 70,000 tons of plastic trash every year, she said, and expects “huge bottlenecks across the whole of England” in the coming months.

Britain’s prime minister, Theresa May, pledged on Thursday to eliminate avoidable wastes within 25 years. In a prepared speech, she urged supermarkets to introduce plastic-free aisles where all the food is loose.

The European Union, for its part, plans to propose a tax on plastic bags and packaging, citing the China ban and the health of the oceans among other reasons.

Those measures might help ease the situation some day, but for now Britain is faced with growing piles of recyclables and no place to put them. Experts say the immediate response to the crisis may well be to turn to incineration or landfills — both harmful to the environment.

China uses facial recognition to monitor ethnic minorities

  China uses facial recognition to monitor ethnic minorities China is adding facial recognition to its overarching surveillance systems in Xinjiang, a Muslim-dominated region in the country's far west that critics claim is under abusive security controls. The geo-fencing tools alert authorities when targets venture beyond a designated 300-meter safe zone, according to an anonymous source who spoke to Bloomberg. Managed by a state-run defense contractor, the so-called "alert project" matches faces from surveillance camera footage to a watchlist of suspects. The pilot forms part of the company's efforts to thwart terrorist attacks by collecting the biometric data of millions of citizens (aged between 12 to 65), which is then linked to China's household registration ID cards. Beijing insists the strict security measures are necessary to tackle numerous incidents of violence and unrest, which it links to Islamic extremists. But activists, including Human Rights Watch, have condemned the policies as a "violation of international human rights norms." China has also been called out for restricting the religious freedoms of the region's 10 million ethnic Uyghurs, most of who are muslims, and for imposing travel restrictions on those belonging to the ethnic minority. China boasts the world's largest monitoring system, with roughly 170 million CCTV cameras across the country, with plans to install 400 million new ones over the next three years. It now plans to add facial recognition to the mix with the help of AI firms in a bid to understand the mound of video evidence, and track suspects and even predict crimes (Minority Report style).

LONDON — Ever since China announced last year that it no longer wanted to be the “world’ s garbage dump,” recycling about half of the globe’ s plastics and paper products, Western nations have been puzzling over what to do when the ban went into effect, which it did on Jan. 1. The answer, to date

LONDON — Ever since China announced last year that it no longer wanted to be the “world’ s garbage dump,” recycling about half of the globe’ s plastics Similar backups have been reported in Canada, Ireland, Germany and several other European nations, while tons of rubbish is piling up in port cities

China’s ban covers imports of 24 kinds of solid waste, including unsorted paper and the low-grade polyethylene terephthalate used in plastic bottles, as part of a broad cleanup effort and a campaign against “yang laji,” or “foreign garbage.” It also sets new limits on the levels of impurities in other recyclables.

China had been processing at least half of the world’s exports of waste paper, metals and used plastic — 7.3 million tons in 2016, according to recent industry data. Last July, China notified the World Trade Organization that it intended to ban some imports of trash, saying the action was needed to protect the environment and improve public health.

“Large amounts of dirty wastes or even hazardous wastes are mixed in the solid waste that can be used as raw materials,” Beijing wrote to the W.T.O. “This polluted China’s environment seriously.”

Chinese officials also complained that much of the recyclable material the country received from overseas had not been properly cleaned or was mixed with non-recyclable materials.

The sudden move has left Western countries scrambling to deal with a buildup of plastic and paper garbage while looking for new markets for the waste.

China says US warship 'violated' its sovereignty

  China says US warship 'violated' its sovereignty Beijing on Saturday said it had dispatched a warship to drive away a US missile destroyer which had "violated" its sovereignty by sailing close to a shoal in the disputed South China Sea. The USS Hopper sailed within 12 nautical miles of Huangyan Island on the night of January 17 without alerting Beijing, the foreign ministry said, referring to the shoal by its Chinese name.Also known as Scarborough Shoal, the ring of reefs lies about 230 kilometres (140 miles) from the Philippines in the South China Sea, where Beijing's claims are hotly contested by other nations.

Officials in Britain and the West are scrambling to cope with growing piles of plastics like this one in China . Don't see anything wrong this time, with China refusing to be the West ' s biggest garbage dump.

Vanden Recycling welcome sensible Government Environment Plan that recognises challenges and opportunities for … Subscribe to our newsletter. Sign up here to get the latest news, updates and special offers delivered directly to your inbox.

“It’s not just a U.K. problem,” said Simon Ellin, chief executive of the Recycling Association in Britain. “The rest of the world is thinking, ‘What can we do?’ It’s tough times.”

In Halifax, Nova Scotia, which sent 80 percent of its recycling to China, Matthew Keliher, the city’s manager of solid waste, said he had largely found alternatives to accept plastic, except for the low-grade plastic film that is used to make shopping bags and for wrapping. Stockpiles of those plastics have so exceeded the city’s storage capacity that Halifax had to get special permission to bury about 300 metric tons of the material in a landfill.

In Calgary, Alberta, which sent 50 percent of its plastics and 100 percent of its mixed papers to China, the material is being stockpiled in empty storage sheds, shipping containers, trailers and warehouses since last fall. So far, 5,000 tons has been collected, Sharon Howland, the city’s lead manager of waste and recycling services, told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

“The material are a sellable resource, so we will store them as long as we can and evaluate our options from there,” she said.

In Britain, even the political class appeared caught by surprise. When asked in front of lawmakers about the impending ban last month, Environment Secretary Michael Gove fumbled: “I don’t know what impact it will have. It is something to which — I will be completely honest — I have not given sufficient thought.”

Scott Boras Refuses to Take Blame for Slow Free Agent Market

  Scott Boras Refuses to Take Blame for Slow Free Agent Market ​Super agent Scott Boras has many of the biggest names on the free agent market as clients. He's the best in the business, and he won't quit until he makes his players big money. With the MLB offseason moving slowly, ​many believe Boras is to blame. His unbelievably high asking prices make it difficult for teams and players to agree, and there is stagnation.However, Boras refuses to take the blame for the slow free agent market. He says he's asking for exactly what owners have paid in the past. He claims now, they're just not paying.many see scott boras as the key man to break this free agent logjam.

One of the largest beverage corporation on the planet [with over 500 (!) sub-brands under its wings] @coca-cola MUST take responsability for ALL the heavily polluting consequences of its global produce !!! That’ s a LOT of plastic garbage, people. And that’ s just òne example.

LONDON — Ever since China announced last year that it no longer wanted to be the “world’ s garbage dump,” recycling about half of the globe’ s plastics Similar backups have been reported in Canada, Ireland, Germany and several other European nations, while tons of rubbish is piling up in port cities

Pollution from plastics has captured global attention in recent years. A new David Attenborough series on the BBC, “Blue Planet II,” has shown plastic bags and bottles clogging oceans and killing fish, turtles and other marine wildlife, prompting governments to put in place more stringent rules.

Every year, Britain sends China enough recyclables to fill up 10,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools, according to Greenpeace U.K. The United States exports more than 13.2 million tons of scrap paper and 1.42 million tons of scrap plastics annually to China, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries has reported. That is the sixth-largest American export to China.

“There may be alternative markets but they’re not ready today,” said Emmanuel Katrakis, the secretary general of the European Recycling Industries’ Confederation in Brussels.

Mr. Katrakis dismissed China’s claims that all imported scrap waste contained high levels of contaminants, and said that Beijing’s thresholds for most types of scrap were “far more demanding” than in Europe or the United States. At the same time, he said, Europe has focused too much on collecting plastic waste and shipping it out, and not enough on encouraging manufacturers to use it in new products.

“We’ve got to start producing less and we’ve got to produce better-quality recyclable goods,” Mr. Ellin said.

Too often, he said, manufacturers produce environmentally harmful products and then “pass the buck” to retailers, who in turn pass it to local councils to pick up the tab to sort out the waste for recycling.

“What’s happened is that the final link in the supply chain has turned around and said: ‘No, we’re not going to take this poor-quality stuff anymore. Keep it for yourself.’”

“The contamination can no longer be more than 0.5 percent,” he said, referring to the stringent levels that China has imposed on some of the materials that it hasn’t banned so far.

Are plastic waste from overseas “the reason why you can’t see blue skies in china?” he asked. “I don’t think so. Go fight the big battles, not the small battles.”

China Says U.S. Govt Shutdown Exposes 'Chronic Flaws' .
"What’s happening in the United States today will make more people worldwide reflect on the viability and legitimacy of such a chaotic political system,” said an editorial in China's Xinhua agency.Funding for federal agencies ran out at midnight on Friday in Washington after lawmakers failed to agree on a stopgap funding bill.

Source: http://us.pressfrom.com/news/world/-112232-plastics-pile-up-as-china-refuses-to-take-the-west-s-recycling/

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!