World UN disputes Myanmar Rohingya repatriation claim

13:11  16 april  2018
13:11  16 april  2018 Source:   cnn.com

When Facebook becomes 'the beast': Myanmar activists say social media aids genocide

  When Facebook becomes 'the beast': Myanmar activists say social media aids genocide As tens of millions of Americans come to grips with revelations that data from Facebook may have been used to sway the 2016 presidential election, on the other side of the world, rights groups say hatemongers have taken advantage of the social network to widely disseminate inflammatory, anti-Muslim speech in Myanmar. The rhetoric is aimed almost exclusively at the disenfranchised Rohingya Muslim minority, a group which has been the target of a sustained campaign of violence and abuse by the Myanmar military, which claims it is targeting terrorists.

A Myanmar minister told Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh on Wednesday (April 11) their repatriation was a priority, during the first visit by a top Myanmar official to victims of what the United Nations says was "ethnic cleansing" by the Myanmar army.

A Myanmar minister told Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh on Wednesday their repatriation was a priority, during the first visit by a top Myanmar official to victims of what the United Nations says was “ethnic cleansing” by the Myanmar army, reports Reuters.

COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH - JANUARY 14: Rohingya refugee children play in Balukhali camp on January 14, 2018 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Over 650,000 Rohingya have crossed the border to Bangladesh since August last year, fleeing the violence at Rakhine State when their villages were attacked and many worry that they will face further reprisals if they return to Myanmar. The refugee camps in Bangladesh no longer seem temporary as thousands of tents made of plastic and bamboo spread across the undulating terrain and long wooden bridges connect parts of the camps divided by water. Existing camps such as Nayapara and Kutupalong have swelled to accommodate the new arrivals since the Myanmar military began its campaign in late August while the Rohingya queue for hours to get rations due to little access to clean water, health care or food and the refugee camps turn into mud-baths whenever it rains. International aid groups and health workers have estimated at least 6,700 Rohingya had met with violent deaths and warn of potential outbreaks of cholera and other preventable diseases due to squalid conditions. (Photo by Allison Joyce/Getty Images) © Allison Joyce/Getty Images AsiaPac/Getty Images COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH - JANUARY 14: Rohingya refugee children play in Balukhali camp on January 14, 2018 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Over 650,000 Rohingya have crossed the border to Bangladesh since August last year, fleeing the violence at Rakhine State when their villages were attacked and many worry that they will face further reprisals if they return to Myanmar. The refugee camps in Bangladesh no longer seem temporary as thousands of tents made of plastic and bamboo spread across the undulating terrain and long wooden bridges connect parts of the camps divided by water. Existing camps such as Nayapara and Kutupalong have swelled to accommodate the new arrivals since the Myanmar military began its campaign in late August while the Rohingya queue for hours to get rations due to little access to clean water, health care or food and the refugee camps turn into mud-baths whenever it rains. International aid groups and health workers have estimated at least 6,700 Rohingya had met with violent deaths and warn of potential outbreaks of cholera and other preventable diseases due to squalid conditions. (Photo by Allison Joyce/Getty Images)

The United Nations and Bangladesh have questioned Myanmar's claim of repatriating the first Rohingya refugees as concerns mount for the safety of returnees.

Myanmar court refuses to dismiss charges against journalists

  Myanmar court refuses to dismiss charges against journalists A Myanmar court has refused to dismiss a case against two Reuters journalists after the reporters' lawyers insisted last week that the evidence doesn't support the charges. The case against Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo has been strongly criticized internationally as an effort by authorities to intimidate the press, especially its coverage of the sensitive situation in Myanmar's Rakhine state, where the military is accused of massive human rights abuses against the Muslim Rohingya minority.

Myanmar finalizes Rohingya repatriation preparations as doubts mount. 25. The United Nations described the operation as ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya , which Myanmar denies.

A Myanmar minister told Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh on Wednesday their repatriation was a priority, during the first visit by a top Myanmar official to victims of what the United Nations says was “ethnic cleansing” by the Myanmar army.

More than 670,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees have fled Buddhist-majority Myanmar into neighboring Bangladesh since August 2017, bringing with them stories of murder, rape and the destruction of villages at the hands of the military.

Under an agreement signed by Yangon and Dhaka, Rohingya refugees should have started to return to Myanmar in January. But the UN and rights groups say the move is dangerously premature.

In a statement on Saturday, Myanmar said it had repatriated the first Rohingya family from refugees who have fled to Bangladesh. However, the UNHCR, the UN's refugee agency, said in a statement on Sunday that it had no direct knowledge of the case and was not consulted or involved in this reported return.

Bangladesh's Refugee Relief and Repatriation Commissioner, Abul Kalam, also disputed the claim.

Seven Myanmar soldiers jailed for Rohingya massacre

  Seven Myanmar soldiers jailed for Rohingya massacre Seven members of Myanmar's military have been sentenced to 10-year prison terms with hard labor for killing 10 Rohingya men last year, the state-run newspaper Global Light of Myanmar reported on Wednesday. The sentences follow an internal investigation carried out by the country's military, or Tatmadaw, which centered on Inn Din, a village in western Rakhine State, where the bodies of the 10 men were found buried in a mass grave in September 2017.

A Myanmar minister told Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh on Wednesday (April 11) their repatriation was a priority, during the first visit by a top Myanmar official to victims of what the United Nations says was ethnic cleansing by the Myanmar army.

Shahriar Alam, a foreign affairs Myanmar is not ready for the repatriation of Rohingya refugees, said the China and Russia oppose UN resolution on Rohingya of Myanmar 's 1. On 9 The United States and others call for a strong stance against Myanmar 's military for their part in the Rohingya crisis.

"The family who went to Myanmar is part of around 6,000 Rohingya living in the no-man's land camp, on the Myanmar side of the zero line," he told CNN.

"Since the family never entered the Bangladesh territory, this is not a repatriation. By definition, this is not an official repatriation," he added.

Zaw Htay, a spokesman for Myanmar's government, said its claim "is not propaganda" and that the family decided to come back of their own volition. "We are taking care of them," he added.

When Facebook becomes 'the beast': Myanmar activists say social media aids genocide

A newly built processing camp for minority Rohingya Muslims is seen in Taung Pyo Letwe, in Rakhine state near Myanmar's border with Bangladesh. © JOE FREEMAN/AFP/AFP/Getty Images A newly built processing camp for minority Rohingya Muslims is seen in Taung Pyo Letwe, in Rakhine state near Myanmar's border with Bangladesh. Ethnic cleansing

The UN and the US say they believe the violence against the Rohingya constitutes ethnic cleansing. Myanmar denies most of the charges, saying its military has only targeted suspected terrorists that killed 12 security officials in late August.

Philippines' Duterte apologizes to Suu Kyi for Myanmar 'genocide' remark

  Philippines' Duterte apologizes to Suu Kyi for Myanmar 'genocide' remark Philippine leader Rodrigo Duterte apologized to Myanmar counterpart Aung San Suu Kyi on Friday for saying genocide was taking taken place in her country, saying his remark was a satirical barb at the West for not taking in Rohingya Muslims. The United Nations and rights groups say nearly 700,000 mostly Muslim Rohingya have fled Myanmar into neighboring Bangladesh since August, after attacks on security forces by Rohingya militants sparked a military crackdown that the United Nations has called ethnic cleansing.

A Myanmar minister told Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh on Wednesday (April 11) their repatriation was a priority, during the first visit by a top Myanmar official to victims of what the United Nations says was "ethnic cleansing" by the Myanmar army.

Myanmar is not ready for the repatriation of Rohingya refugees, said the most senior United Nations official to visit the country this year, after Myanmar was accused of instigating ethnic cleansing and driving almost 700,000 Muslims to Bangladesh.

However, in January the military admitted involvement in the killing of 10 Rohingya buried in a mass grave. Seven soldiers were sentenced to 10-year prison terms with hard labor last week over the killings.

The Rohingya have long faced persecution in Buddhist-majority Myanmar, which describes them as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh -- effectively denying them citizenship -- despite the fact that many families can trace their roots back hundreds of years.

Last week, UNHCR released a statement saying "conditions in Myanmar are not yet conducive for returns to be safe, dignified, and sustainable".

Rohingya continue to flee Myanmar. Last week, according to Matthew Smith, co-founder of Fortify Rights, some 70 of them left on a boat heading for Malaysia.

"Rohingya refugees on the move: Boat with 70 on board is likely arrive in Thai or Malaysian waters in a matter of days, assuming they don't capsize or face other problems at sea," Smith tweeted.

Between 2012 and 2015, more than 112,000 Rohingya fled, largely by boat, to Malaysia. In May 2015, the world watched in horror as human traffickers stranded thousands of mainly Rohingya in the Bay of Bengal on rickety boats with scant supplies of food and water.

How the families of 10 massacred Rohingya fled Myanmar .
<p>Rehana Khatun dreamed her husband came home. He appeared without warning in their village in western Myanmar, outside their handsome wooden house shaded by mango trees. "He didn't say anything," she said. "He was only there for a few seconds, and then he was gone." Then Rehana Khatun woke up.</p>Rehana Khatun dreamed her husband came home. He appeared without warning in their village in western Myanmar, outside their handsome wooden house shaded by mango trees. "He didn't say anything," she said. "He was only there for a few seconds, and then he was gone." Then Rehana Khatun woke up.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!